Long range weather planning tools – 4 favorites

All of us spend a lot of time poring over radar images, METARs and TAFs. But the focus is almost always on the short term weather products: can I fly right now? However, with some upgraded apps and websites becoming publicly available, there are more options than ever for long range weather planning. Here are four favorites.

Accident report – what would you do differently?

This article is the first in a regular series where we will examine accident reports. But we hope to do something different here at Air Facts. Instead of just proclaiming Pilot Error and assuming “it couldn’t happen to me,” we hope to use the NTSB reports to become safer pilots. The question we’ll pose each time is: “what will I change about my flying after reading this report?”

Debate: is registering drones a good idea?

The FAA kicked off one of its most aggressive rulemaking efforts in history this week, as the drone industry task force met to consider how to register the hundreds of thousands of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) projected to be sold this Christmas. Will it work?

More than just a gadget – how the iPad is making flying safer

For all their cynicism, pilots have adopted tablets and apps like eager teenagers. Just five years ago, no one had ever heard of an “Electronic Flight Bag app.” Today, the majority of general aviation pilots – and a whole bunch of airline and military pilots too – are flying with one. How many other tools are used by Air Force tanker pilots and J-3 Cub drivers alike?

7 ways to scare yourself in an airplane

Most pilots aren’t dare devils, but sometimes the only way to learn an important lesson is to scare yourself just a little. That doesn’t mean we should seek out frightening experiences, only that we should try to learn from them when we inevitably stumble into one. Here are seven common ways to scare yourself in an airplane, and I’m sad to say I’ve experienced all of them (but only once!).

Debate: do you support the revised Third Class Medical proposal?

Reforming (or eliminating) the aging Third Class Medical process has been the dream of aviation organizations and individual pilots for years. This reform seems closer than ever, thanks to a lot of lobbying from a lot of aviation organizations. But as usual, the devil is in the details.

Go or No Go: battling a Nor’easter?

As a corporate pilot, you watch your phone continuously – if it rings, you’re probably going flying. Today, you’re really hoping it doesn’t ring, because there’s a nasty weather system parked across the eastern US – right where you often fly. So of course Murphy’s Law is in effect and the boss calls.

The world needs aviation – how flying keeps us grounded

Before I stray too far into religion or politics, let me assure you I am not running for office. But all the complaining does make me consider the unique role aviation has played in my life, and most pilots’ lives I suspect. Might it be the miracle cure we’re looking for? Consider the following.

Stop the drone panic – pilots should take their own advice

For an industry that’s usually obsessed with “risk management,” aviation sure isn’t using much of it when it comes to drones. The constant drumbeat of stories about close encounters between airplanes and unmanned aerial systems (UAS) can be described as nothing short of a panic. Enough already.

Friday photo: Chicago skyline

This week’s Friday Photo shares the view from an annual aviation pilgrimage – the flight to Oshkosh in mid-summer. From many parts of the US, this flight means the chance to fly past the Chicago skyline, which offers a stunning view.

Look beyond the hype – ICON just might help aviation

It’s been nearly impossible to miss ICON for the last five years. The sexy design of the company’s amphibian light sport airplane has been matched only by the company’s sexy marketing. But now that ICON has finally delivered the first A5, it’s worth revisiting the project with an open mind. I see reasons for both hope and skepticism, but maybe more of the former.

The art of instrument approaches – 7 tips for proficient flying

Instrument training is demanding, but at its most basic the goal is quite simple: keep the wings level and the needles crossed. Do that a few times with an examiner and you can pass the checkride. But if your goal is to really use your instrument rating (and do it safely), there’s a lot more to consider.

Letter to myself as a young student pilot

So you’re taking a flying lesson tomorrow. Congrats. You’ll have a blast (yes, the instructor really will let you fly the airplane), but you may be surprised how much this flying thing will change your life. With that in mind, here’s some free advice from someone who knows a little about the journey ahead.

Real world missed approaches – 6 tips for staying safe

The missed approach is really a maximum performance maneuver. The key is to make your decisions long before you ever start the approach, so a missed approach is an automatic reaction. MDA is no time to be making decisions; it’s a time for executing what you’ve already planned.

Go or No Go: is there any way through this line?

Your 1981 Piper Aztec and you have been through a lot in 10 years and 3000 hours, including plenty of single pilot IFR trips. But today is going to be a test for both of you – your proposed trip home from Shreveport, Louisiana to Amarillo, Texas is filled with rain, low ceilings and some convective activity.

Electric airplanes – is the tipping point upon us?

Just like a Chicago Cubs appearance in the World Series, predictions about the coming electric aircraft boom seem to pop up every year, only to be crushed by reality. But four recent developments should be intriguing, if not revolutionary, for general aviation pilots.

Debate: do electronic stability systems improve safety?

More and more airplanes are being equipped with Electronic Stability systems, which monitor the pilot’s performance at all times and gently nudge the controls back towards stable flight. Will such systems improve safety, or are they merely the latest gadget?