Are you ready? Flying the Alaska bush
Flying to Oshkosh low and slow

Flying to Oshkosh low and slow

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My first flight – as told by my grandpa
Ghosts in the hangar: a true aviation short story
Quiz: IFR holding procedures

Quiz: IFR holding procedures

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Friday Photo: Amsterdam canals

Uber concept for VTOL

Silicon Valley discovers aviation – but for how long?

New Articles

Our most recent posts

Friday Photo: Amsterdam canals

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Flying over Amsterdam isn’t easy, but Gerhard van Roon says he wouldn’t trade it for anything: “once over the target and the safety pilot has taken the yoke with me hanging with my cameras out of the window, I am sure that there isn’t a job in the world as beautiful and satisfying as mine!” As this week’s Friday photo shows, he does have quite the view.

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Uber concept for VTOL

Silicon Valley discovers aviation – but for how long?

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You have to pay close attention these days to keep up with all the breathless news about “flying cars” and “disruptive aerial vehicles.” The great and the good from the technology world have fallen in love with aviation lately, and their various startup companies have been launching aviation projects at an unprecedented rate in 2017. Do any of them have a chance? Does it matter?

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Super Cub

Are you ready? Flying the Alaska bush

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I’m going to fly along with you as you take your Cessna 206 Stationair II for a flight to pick up a client out in the flat country beyond the Alaska Range. Your client lives in a log cabin along the Kuskokwim River, downstream from the village of Aniak. You’ve made sure to have the necessary flight charts with you.

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Piper L-4

Flying to Oshkosh low and slow

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Like many pilots, flying my plane to Oshkosh was on my bucket list, but work, cost, and time always seemed to say “not this year.” So, in 2012 when the Cub Club announced the “Cubs To Oshkosh” in celebration of the 75th anniversary of the Cub, that was it. I had to be part of that history. This is my story of that trip.

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Cade by airplane

My first flight – as told by my grandpa

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Saturday October 16, 2010. Mom and I were at a craft show when Grandpa called to see if I could go fly with him today. He tried to take me before but something always came up, like I hadn’t had my nap. When you’re four years old everybody knows no nap and flying aren’t a good mix. Today was my lucky day.

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Quiz: IFR holding procedures

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Most pilots don’t fly holds too often these days, but that doesn’t mean you can ignore them. Whether it’s a hold on an instrument approach or knowing when not to hold, there is a lot to know. Take our 10-question quiz to test your knowledge of IFR holding procedures and see if you’re still current.

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Crosswind landing A380

Turbulent flying lessons: windy tales

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The potential for turbulence should be an integral part of pre- and in-flight weather study. And I found over the years that experience is the best teacher because with turbulence what you feel is what you get. If flying IFR in clouds, the fact that turbulence there makes many riders uneasy and uncomfortable has to be acknowledged, and even some pilots riding as passengers get antsy in bumpy clouds.

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Dick's Blog

Opinion and analysis from Richard Collins
Crosswind landing A380

Turbulent flying lessons: windy tales

by

The potential for turbulence should be an integral part of pre- and in-flight weather study. And I found over the years that experience is the best teacher because with turbulence what you feel is what you get. If flying IFR in clouds, the fact that turbulence there makes many riders uneasy and uncomfortable has to be acknowledged, and even some pilots riding as passengers get antsy in bumpy clouds.

Read More
Aztec on one engine

What’s wrong with piston twin pilots?

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Back in the heyday of piston airplanes being used for personal and business travel, one question was most often asked of owners of high-performance singles: When are you going to step up to a twin? It was automatically assumed that everyone wanted to and all would when they could afford it. In the history of private aviation, though, new piston twins were not a big factor.

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What about those spins?

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The low altitude, low speed loss of control has always dominated and back in the good old days this was often dismissed with the comment: he ran out of airspeed and ideas at the same time and he spun in. Do pilots know enough about spins?

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John's Blog

From Air Facts Editor John Zimmerman
Uber concept for VTOL

Silicon Valley discovers aviation – but for how long?

by

You have to pay close attention these days to keep up with all the breathless news about “flying cars” and “disruptive aerial vehicles.” The great and the good from the technology world have fallen in love with aviation lately, and their various startup companies have been launching aviation projects at an unprecedented rate in 2017. Do any of them have a chance? Does it matter?

Read More
Garmin G5 panel

The death knell for the vacuum pump?

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This year’s Sun ‘n Fun Fly-in didn’t have any flashy new product introductions – no $50,000 LSAs or supersonic jets from unknown startups – but there may have been a more important trend unfolding. The vacuum-driven gyro may finally be on the way out. Thank goodness.

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I Can't Believe I Did That

Learn from other pilots' mistakes
152 in a spin

A humbling solo flight

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So I poured the power on and hauled back on the yoke. With the lighter load, that yoke came right back and the nose of the plane pointed right up. For a split second I thought “that’s strange” and before I knew it, I was pointing straight down at the ground in a left spin.

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Cessna 150

Tomorrow’s good enough for me

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This story happened many years ago to my father-in-law and me, and the statute of limitations has hopefully run out on any broken or bruised FARs we might have encountered during the course of events. Nevertheless, there is a debt to be paid: that is the debt to one’s own conscience when, years later, you look back on things and realize your own stupidity.

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Luscombe

Miracle at Mojave: surviving an airplane crash

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At an altitude of about 50 feet, the airplane stalled and Gus lost control. Given our present situation, a team of engineers, analyzing every available factor, would be hard pressed to come up with a set of circumstances that would make this event survivable. I closed my eyes just before the lights went out.

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Friday Photo

Incredible views from the cockpit

Friday Photo: Amsterdam canals

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Flying over Amsterdam isn’t easy, but Gerhard van Roon says he wouldn’t trade it for anything: “once over the target and the safety pilot has taken the yoke with me hanging with my cameras out of the window, I am sure that there isn’t a job in the world as beautiful and satisfying as mine!” As this week’s Friday photo shows, he does have quite the view.

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Friday Photo: Mt. Shasta off the wing

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Mount Shasta is a stunning sight from any altitude, but when it’s passing off the right wing the towering peak looks particularly good. That’s exactly the picture Dale Morris captured from his RV-6A on a sightseeing flight with his wife.

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Friday Photo: Helgeland coast in Norway

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One of the best parts of our Friday Photo series is the wide variety of locations we get to share. This week’s photo is a great example: Thor Fredrik Eie took this beautiful picture of Torghatten in northern Norway on a recent sightseeing flight. The rocky coast and the blue skies make for a unique view over the nose of his Cessna.

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